3D printing of milk protein structures being investigated

Researchers from the Laboratory of Food Process Engineering at Wageningen University in the Netherlands, in collaboration with FrieslandCampina, are researching and developing methods for 3D printing protein-rich foods using sodium caseinate, a high-quality protein found in mammalian milk.

Dr Maarten Schutyser, professor, Food Process Engineering, Wageningen University said  they are slowly learning more about 3D printing technology.

Wageningen’s research into 3D printing protein-rich foods falls into the second category Maarten said. “The research, a collaborative effort between Wageningen University and FrieslandCampina, the world’s largest dairy cooperative, aims to develop FDM 3D printed protein-rich foods that are both tasty and nutritious, delivering essential, high-quality protein nutrients while eliminating food waste.”

“With 3D printing you can tailor your product or food to the individual needs of people who have certain health requirements and lifestyles, and you can print the product on command”, he said. To read more, click HERE.

Published on Tue, 26th Apr 2016 - 11:02

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